What are some safety tips for construction workers?

Few jobs have as many hazards as construction. Workers only want to do the job and return home safely. Safety measures should be in place on every construction job….

Few jobs have as many hazards as construction. Workers only want to do the job and return home safely. Safety measures should be in place on every construction job. When an accident occurs involving injuries, not only do the injured workers pay, but the job site may be shut down and completion of the project delayed.

Here are a few safety measures that can help workers avoid the common injuries on a construction site:

— Sit down when possible when you are working at lower levels. Not every job requires construction workers to be up in the air. Lower level jobs can put a strain on your waist and knees. Sitting down on a stable stool can help avoid these injuries.

— Use tools that are ergonomically correct. When you use tools that are poorly designed, it is possible to develop medical conditions such as trigger finger, white finger, tendonitis and carpel tunnel syndrome.

— Lift objects using the strength of your legs. Backaches are common for construction workers and it’s often due to lifting incorrectly. Make sure to bend your knees and don’t twist to the side whenever you lifting.

— Keep your arms and wrists neutral. You could feel a variety of symptoms by the end of your shift, such as tingling, swelling and pain. Carpal tunnel syndrome can also develop.

— Keep your tool belt balanced. While nice to use because of the convenience, a tool belt that is unevenly balanced can mess with your body’s alignment.

These are just a few of the many safety tips that apply to construction workers. If you are injured in a construction accident, you have a right to seek workers’ compensation benefits. If you are denied, an experienced lawyer can help you file an appeal.

Source: safetyservicescompany.com, “5 Safety Tips for Construction Workers on Avoiding Stress and Injury,” accessed April 29, 2016

How can you prevent construction accidents this summer?

As the weather warms up, construction crews of all types begin to take on more projects. And of course, when this happens, the likelihood of an accident is much…

As the weather warms up, construction crews of all types begin to take on more projects. And of course, when this happens, the likelihood of an accident is much greater.

Nobody knows for sure why construction accidents increase during the summer months, but some of the potential culprits include longer daylight hours, more distractions, vacation planning, and different sleeping patterns.

While this is a major concern, there are steps companies can take to prevent accidents during the summer months. These include:

— Holding regular meetings to ensure that everybody is on the same page at all times.

— Making sure all workers are wearing the appropriate gear, even if the weather is warm.

— Hydration. When temperatures heat up, the chance of dehydration also increases. It is essential for all workers to stay hydrated, even if they are not feeling poorly.

— Protect against working too many hours. With long daylight hours and nice weather, some workers are tempted to stay on the job for too long. When this happens, a person gets tired, which can lead to an accident that causes serious injury or even death.

There is no sure fire way to prevent construction accidents this summer, but there are steps employers and workers can take to protect against this.

If for any reason a person is injured in a construction accident, he or she should not wait to receive medical attention. The individual should call for help from the site and then do whatever it takes to make a full recovery. Furthermore, it’s important to let your employer know what happened.

Source: For Construction Pros, “Ten Tips to Prevent the Construction-Accident High Season,” accessed April 06, 2016

Construction accidents, insurance companies and more

Working on a construction site is never easy. Even if you are being extremely careful, there is always the chance you could suffer a serious injury. Just because you…

Working on a construction site is never easy. Even if you are being extremely careful, there is always the chance you could suffer a serious injury.

Just because you are working in a dangerous industry is not an excuse to suffer an injury due to the negligence of an employer or other party.

A construction accident can include anything from a slip and fall to a scaffolding collapse. That is just the start, too.

Some of the most common construction site injuries include:

— Broken bones

— Head and neck injuries

— Back injuries

— Shoulder injuries

— Injuries due to a fall from height

— Crush injuries

— Toxic exposure

— Joint injuries

— Repetitive stress injuries

When a person is injured on a construction site, it’s imperative that he or she seeks immediate medical attention. The employer should also be made aware of exactly what happened.

Moving on, remember this: The insurance company may attempt to take advantage of you, as they don’t want you to collect benefits associated with the injury. They will use every trick imaginable to keep you from getting the money you deserve.

Have you been injured on the job? Don’t hesitate to contact our law firm for assistance. We are here to provide you with advice, answer your questions and make sure you get what is owed to you as soon as possible. You can learn more about construction accidents by reading our website and blog. If you need personalized advice, don’t hesitate to contact us via phone or online. Either way, we are here to help.

What are the most common causes of construction safety accidents?

If you work in the construction industry, you realize one thing to be true: Accidents are a part of your job. While this may be true to a certain…

If you work in the construction industry, you realize one thing to be true: Accidents are a part of your job. While this may be true to a certain extent, it doesn’t mean you have to give in to the fact that you will some day be injured in an accident.

All construction workers should understand the most common causes of accidents. This goes a long way in helping them avoid trouble.

There are four primary categories of construction safety accidents, including the following:

— Falls. With so many people climbing and working at height, the chance of a fall is always a possibility.

— Electrical incidents. There are many types of electrical accidents, including but not limited to the improper use of equipment and contact with power lines.

— Struck by an object. When a construction worker is struck by an object, such as a piece of equipment, there is a good chance of injury.

— Trenching and evacuation.

Every company should do whatever they can to improve the safety of each construction site. The same holds true for the workers. When everybody is on the same page, there is less chance of an accident.

Construction workers enjoy their job, but this does not mean they are okay with the idea that they could be injured at some point. If you want to avoid trouble, make sure you are familiar with all the safety risks associated with your worksite and position. This is no guarantee that you will avoid trouble, but it can definitely work in your favor.

Source: Lorman Education Services, “The Top 4 Causes of Construction Safety Accidents,” accessed Dec. 28, 2015

Construction worker injuries and on-the-job safety

There are a number of safety issues that construction workers face on the job that other workers do not. Some safety concerns, though, are very similar. In 2012, there…

There are a number of safety issues that construction workers face on the job that other workers do not. Some safety concerns, though, are very similar.

In 2012, there are 4,175 worker deaths. Just over 19 percent were in the construction industry — or just over 800 workers. More than half of those deaths were caused by only factors:

— Falls accounted for 279 construction worker deaths in 2012.

— Seventy-nine workers died after being struck by an object.

— Electrocution was the cause of death for another 66 workers.

— Thirteen deaths were caused by workers being caught in between something.

It’s not just fatal injuries, though. Construction laborers also were injured more than many other types of workers.

At MHK Attorneys, we work to protect the rights of injured construction workers. We know that most construction workers know there is a high chance of injury for workers in their industry; however, when workers are injured because of a negligent employer, that is a different story.

Contract workers and employees can seek compensation when they are injured. This is especially true if a third party, such as the manufacturer of faulty equipment is to blame for the accident. We work diligently to get our clients the compensation they deserve after a construction accident.

Insurance companies will try to convince you that you don’t need the benefits you deserve. We’re used to fighting these large corporations and we know their tricks. We want you to know that we will be right beside during the entire process. Visit our website to learn more.

What are construction’s Fatal Four?

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration is staffed with the responsibility of keeping workers safe at their place of employment. Along with state partners, the agency takes great…

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration is staffed with the responsibility of keeping workers safe at their place of employment. Along with state partners, the agency takes great pride in protecting the well being of more than 130 million workers. Even so, no agency is able to prevent every workplace accident.

According to OSHA, nearly 5,000 people were killed on the job last year. This works out to approximately 13 deaths every day of the week.

When it comes to dangerous work environments, construction is at the top of the list. In 2014, 20 percent of worker deaths were in construction.

OSHA understands that many types of accidents can occur, with the “Fatal Four” needing the most attention. These accidents include:

— Falls

— Electrocutions

— Struck by object

— Caught in or caught between

For example, approximately 40 percent of total deaths in the construction industry in 2014 were from falls. This is followed by 8.5 percent caused by electrocutions, 8.4 percent struck by object, and 1.4 percent for caught in/between accidents.

It is good to know that OSHA understands the seriousness of these types of accidents. But here is the problem: It is difficult to reduce the number of accidents that occur within the construction industry, among others.

Federal and state agencies, along with employers and employees, should work together to promote the safest possible work environment. This is easier said than done, but any progress is better than none at all.

It only takes one mistake in the workplace to seriously injury or kill a worker. At that point, the company is then turned upside down for quite some time.

Source: Occupational Safety and Health Administration, “Commonly Used Statistics,” accessed Oct. 07, 2015

Without independent agreement, injured worker wins workers’ comp

A recent story out of Fleetwood, Pennsylvania, shows employers and employees the importance of signing contracts in a timely manner. Reportedly, an independent subcontractor hired as a painter for…

A recent story out of Fleetwood, Pennsylvania, shows employers and employees the importance of signing contracts in a timely manner. Reportedly, an independent subcontractor hired as a painter for Lee’s Metal Roof Coatings & Painting in 2011 is entitled to workers’ compensation for injuries received in a fall.

The worker was injured on May 6, 2011, when he fell from a roof, striking his head and injuring his right knee and left ankle. The accident reportedly occurred several days after the contracting company hired the worker. In October of the same year, the injured party filed a workers’ compensation claim despite that he was allegedly hired as an independent contractor.

The owner of the company claimed that no employment relationship existed between the two parties when the incident occurred as an independent agreement was never signed. However, the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania disagreed, ruling in the injured party’s favor. The story indicates that the injured party “might have” signed the agreement after his release from the hospital, but the court says it does not matter. Since the contract was not signed prior to the accident, it places the injured worker in the realm of employee rather than independent contractor.

In order to receive workers’ comp benefits, an injured worker must show that he or she was an employee, that the injury occurred during work and that it resulted in a loss of earning potential. It seems the injured party in this case did exactly that and will receive benefits for his injuries.

This story reveals the importance of exploring all of the options when injured during the course of employment. When it seems as if you have no chance of winning your right to workers’ compensation, discussing the matter with an experienced attorney might make all the difference.

Source: Business Insurance, “Timing is everything: Before signing contract, worker was employee,” Stephanie Goldberg, July 22, 2015

Construction worker killed by tractor-trailer on I-95

Construction zones present many dangers to the people working in them. According to the Federal Highway Administration, in 2010, there were 576 fatalities because of work zone crashes. That…

Construction zones present many dangers to the people working in them. According to the Federal Highway Administration, in 2010, there were 576 fatalities because of work zone crashes. That amounts to one fatality every 15 hours.

On June 25, at about 1:30 a.m., a 62-year-old construction worker was killed on I-95 near Beltzville, Maryland. According to a captain with the Maryland State Police, a tractor-trailer crashed into the work zone site after it didn’t “follow a bend in the road.” The contractors that were working had all the right safety equipment where it was supposed to be.

After crashing into the work site, the semi-truck continued on and struck an attenuator truck. It had a flashing arrow on and the lights were on. The attenuator truck then crashed into another vehicle, which was also struck by the semi-truck. The semi then hit the construction worker, killing him.

The driver of the semi-truck was injured and was transported to Prince George’s County Hospital. The State Police captain said that the injuries suffered by the driver were not considered life-threatening.

The driver’s logs are being reviewed by investigators to determine where the driver was coming from, if he had been following the regulations regarding hours and more.

If you are injured because of a truck driver’s negligence, you have recourse available. You can sue the driver for your expenses, losses and damages. In addition, workers’ compensation should pay for your medical bills, lost wages, rehabilitation and more. An attorney experienced in workers’ compensation and personal injury can be very helpful during this difficult time.

Source: wtop.com, “I-95 reopens after fatal Md. crash,” June 25, 2015

Is there a real risk from chemical exposure during welding?

Yes. If you work construction or in a heavy-industrial setting, welding might be something you see every day. Whether it’s your job to operate a welder or you work nearby,…

Yes. If you work construction or in a heavy-industrial setting, welding might be something you see every day. Whether it’s your job to operate a welder or you work nearby, however, you need to be aware of the potential hazards of exposure to potentially toxic welding fumes and chemicals associated with the welding process.

Unfortunately, toxic exposure is a serious risk in many industries. In the context of workers’ compensation law, the phrase “toxic exposure” simply means workplace exposure to a chemical, dust, or other toxin. Sometimes this causes immediate injury. Other times, it can cause or contribute toward a worker developing a serious, long-term occupational illness.

Among the most serious hazards in welding can be invisible

It’s obvious that the extreme heat and light from welding could cause serious injuries. Without the appropriate personal protective equipment, however, welders and others who work nearby could be exposed to potentially toxic gases.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, welding fumes produced by welding aluminum, mild steel or iron during manual metal arc or oxy-acetylene welding commonly contain metals that have been heated so much that they become gas. Aluminum, iron or zinc oxide gas, fluorine, arsenic, beryllium, silicate, and other toxins can be present in welding fumes.

One of the most dangerous is manganese from the base metal or the welding rods, wire and flux. Welding within a confined space increases the risk of exposure to hazardous levels of toxic gases like manganese.

‘Metal fume fever’ is the least of your problems

An estimated 30 to 40 percent of all welders have suffered from metal fume fever, which causes delayed flu-like symptoms and typically requires just a couple of days off work. Unfortunately, exposure to manganese welding fumes can also cause neurological damage, including a serious disorder called “manganism,” which has symptoms somewhat like Parkinson’s disease.

If you have suffered a chemical injury or believe you may have developed an illness due to toxic exposure at the workplace, it’s very important to act right away. Assuming your sickness was caused by job-related activities and you’re otherwise eligible, you should be covered by for workers’ compensation. However, workers’ comp insurers will require a great deal of detailed medical information and may even deny your claim at first, so you may want to discuss your situation with a lawyer.

Truck driver turns self in to face charges in construction death

Road construction crews on the highway usually must work near traffic rushing by. Though state law penalizes drivers for causing accidents in construction zones, and crews put up barriers, cones…

Road construction crews on the highway usually must work near traffic rushing by. Though state law penalizes drivers for causing accidents in construction zones, and crews put up barriers, cones and signs, accidents still happen. A construction worker has almost no time to react to a car or truck bearing down on them, and likely will suffer terrible harm when hit.

A driver who fails to notice or ignores warnings to slow down for road workers can easily cause a worker’s death. That is what happened last summer, when a truck driver struck two construction workers on the Pennsylvania Turnpike, killing one of them. After being charged in the crash, the driver turned himself in to Pennsylvania State Police earlier in March.

The deceased was a 61-year-old employee of the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission. Last June, he and a crew were doing maintenance work on the Turnpike in the eastern part of the state. While they were working, a tractor trailer driven by the defendant entered the lane the crew had closed off and struck the victim, along with another crew member. The second worker sustained minor injuries.

It appears the investigation into this terrible incident took several months, but it did eventually lead to charges of homicide by vehicle. Police believe the driver was speeding at the time of the crash. The accident led State Police to put radar traps in construction vehicles. They found dozens of drivers speeding through construction zones near the site of the fatal incident.

After surrendering to police, the driver apologized to the victim’s family.